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Law

Why Law?

The legal system is a complex essential foundation of our society used in a variety of jobs, and not just the obvious ones such as the police or a solicitor. Invariably people break bylaws which they were completely unaware existed. Study this course and take a fascinating journey into the many facets of the English Legal System, and Criminal Law and Justice through studying the interesting range of units in this course.

Summary of content

The WJEC GCE AS and A level in Law enable learners to develop an understanding of both public and private law within the law of Wales and England, and develop skills which will prepare them for further undergraduate study and future careers. The specification enables learners to develop their ability to analyse both legal rules and principles and factual issues. It enables learners to construct persuasive legal arguments and to evaluate the strength of such arguments. It also enables learners to develop the ability to think critically about the role of law in society.

Units

The Nature of Law

The nature of law must include the study of the distinction between enforceable legal rules and principles and other rules and norms of behaviour; criminal and civil law and the different sources of law i.e. custom, statutory law and the common law.

At AS the nature of law is assessed in Unit 1. At A2 the pervasive nature of law and society, law and morality and law and justice is assessed in Unit 3 and Unit 4.

Law and society

  • Rule of law; human rights; the meaning and importance of fault in civil and/or criminal law
  • Balancing conflicting interests; identification of the different interests of parties to disputes
  • Public interests against private interests; the subordination of individual rights to community interests

Law and morality

  • The distinction between law and morals
  • The diversity of moral views in a pluralist society
  • The relationship between law and morals and its importance
  • The legal enforcement of moral values

Law and justice

  • The meaning of ‘justice'; theories of justice
  • The extent to which substantive legal rules, legal institutions and processes achieve justice or create barriers to justice

Legal skills

Legal skills are an intrinsic part of the AS and A2 units. Learners are required to develop competence in using legal skills in their study of the nature of law, legal issues and the Welsh and English legal systems, and the private and public areas of substantive law.

AS - Unit 1 - The Nature of Law and the Welsh and English Legal Systems

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

25% of the qualification; 60 marks

Section A focuses on the nature of law and the various methods of law making in the Welsh and English legal systems.

1.1 Law making

1.2 Delegated legislation

1.3 Statutory interpretation

1.4 Judicial Precedent

Section B focuses on key features of the criminal justice system and civil justice system within the Welsh and English legal systems, including legal personnel and legal funding. It also includes the nature of law.

1.5 Civil courts

1.6 Criminal process

1.7 Legal personnel

1.8 Access to justice and funding

AS - Unit 2 - The Law of Tort

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

15% of the qualification; 60 marks

This unit requires learners to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the rules and theory of the law of tort. Learners will develop knowledge and understanding of liability in negligence for injury to people and will be required to apply the elements of the law of negligence to hypothetical scenarios. They will develop knowledge and understanding of occupiers’ liability. Learners will also develop knowledge and understanding of remedies, including damages, mitigation of loss and injunctions.

2.1 The rules and theory of the law of tort

2.2 Liability in negligence for injury to people and damage to property

2.3 Occupiers’ liability

2.4 Remedies

A2 - Unit 3 - The Practice of Substantive Law

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

30% of qualification; 100 marks

This unit requires learners to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two areas of law from the areas listed: Human rights law, Law of contract, Criminal law.

Human Rights Law

3.1 The rules and theory of human rights law

3.2 Specific provisions within the European Convention on Human Rights

3.3 Restrictions, including restrictions permitted by the European Convention on Human Rights

3.4 Enforcement

3.5 The debate relating to the protection of human rights in the UK

Law of Contract

3.6 Rules and theory of the law of contract

3.7 Essential requirements of contract, including privity of contract

3.8 Express and implied terms, conditions, warranties and innominate terms, exclusion and limitation clauses

3.9 Misrepresentation and economic duress

3.10 Discharge of contract including breach of contract, performance and frustration

3.11 Remedies including damages and equitable remedies

Criminal Law

3.12 Rules and theory of criminal law

3.13 General elements of liability

3.14 Offences against the person

3.15 Property offences, including theft and robbery

3.16 Defences

3.17 Preliminary offences of attempt

A2 - Unit 4 - Substantive Law Perspectives

Written examination: 2 hours

30% of the qualification; 100 marks

This unit requires learners to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two areas of law from the areas listed: human rights law, law of contract, criminal law.

The content of this unit is the same as shown for Unit 3 above.

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